At UTEC we realize that any serious claims of success have to be backed up with data, hard and objective data collected over time. So, at UTEC we make a point to carefully and consistently measure the “social and economic success” of our mission in three critical areas for our proven-risk young people:

  • Reduced recidivism
  • Increased employability
  • Increased educational attainment

These outcomes are UTEC’s driving force. We collect a common set of information for the youth we serve to determine the relationship between UTEC programming and youth outcomes.

This year’s Outcomes & Impact Snapshot (below) highlights UTEC’s positive outcomes in reducing recidivism. Our work connects directly with the current conversation around young adult justice, focused on the idea that young adults up to age 25 may have needs and characteristics distinct from both juveniles and older adults. The full Outcomes Report will be released later this fall – so stay tuned!

In July, the National Institute of Justice highlighted UTEC in its environmental scan of programs serving justice-involved young people. Here in Massachusetts, the Council of State Governments Justice Center presented findings about recidivism in our state and noted key updates about young adults ages 18-24:

  • Young adults (ages 18-24) have the highest rate of incarceration in Massachusetts, making up nearly one-quarter of the county jail / house of correction population.
  • More than half (51%) of 18-24 year-olds who are released from county jails are re-arraigned within 1 year, and 76% are re-arraigned within 3 years.

Last year, 89% of UTEC-enrolled young people were NOT arrested, a dramatic difference from the statewide average. Our long-term outcome is also positive. Two years after leaving UTEC, 83% of young people had not been arrested.

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To download a PDF version of the above snapshot, click here.

 

 

The post UTEC Model Reduces Recidivism appeared first on UTEC Blog.

Source: Lowell Sun